• Where Ships Go to Die, Workers Risk Everything | National Geographic

    In Bangladesh, men desperate for work perform one of the world's most dangerous jobs. They demolish huge ships in grueling conditions, braving disease, pollution, and the threat of being crushed or stabbed by steel sliced from the hulls. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Explore the lives of ship-breakers on...

    published: 16 Apr 2014
  • Ship breaking industry in India - Alang, Gujarat

    Alang beach (Gujurat, India) is one of the main ship breaking yards in the world. Alang is a census town in Bhavnagar district in the Indian state of Gujarat, India.Alang is known as land of lakes and temples. However today Alang is known for being Asia's largest and world's one of the most important Ship Recycling Yard where various material like Melting scrap, Cast Iron Scrap (Beed), Rolling Material, Profile Plates, Marine Machinery, Marine Engine, Diesel Generating Sets, Electric Motors and so many other items which are available in huge quantity of various qualities are mostly tested and certified by the world famous Lloyds Certifying Co. of England. As per the international reports, more ships for demolition are expected for Alang as Ocean freight is very down. Presently, Alang & ...

    published: 15 Jun 2015
  • The Ship Breakers of Bangladesh: VICE INTL

    There aren't too many places left in the world where the practice of ship breaking—scrapping old ships for metal—can still exist. These days, environmental and labor regulations in the developed world have displaced the practice to India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan, where cargo carriers are salvaged for their steel. The largest vessels wind up on the shores of the city of Chittagong in Bangladesh, where the industry has become a vital part of the country's urbanization. It employs roughly 200,000 workers and supplies the country with 80 percent of its steel. Ship breakers beach and dismantle vessels daily wearing flip­-flops and T-shirts. It's no easy task, considering ships are constructed to withstand the elements for the 30 years they spend operating on international waters. We decided t...

    published: 09 Feb 2015
  • Shipbreakers

    This feature documentary profiles a bustling Indian shantytown where 40,000 people live and work in the most primitive conditions.

    published: 21 Jun 2017
  • The Wire Nest...life In Mumbai's Shipbreaking Yards

    We all have heard of the Titanic, its love story, and how it laid to rest under the ocean. But for lesser ships there is a different grave waiting. One which is an obscure & lucrative business for a few known as Ship breaking, Countless numbers of used ships are sent to developing countries like China, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Turkey where they are systematically broken down by the cheap labor hired by these ship breakers . 'The Wire Nest...Life In Mumbai's Ship-Breaking Yards' is a documentary on the condition of these workers, the majority who live in filthy and hazardous circumstances .This documentary specifically gives an insight on the conditions of the ship breaking workers in Mumbai the city which is the hub for many activities known and unknown. To build awareness and give ...

    published: 24 Jan 2013
  • Echoes of Ship Breaking

    The bothering heat and shouts of his Mukadam mingles with the echoes of machine and men usually 30 to 70 feet below him. He has to silence it all when he turns on his blow torch and focuses solely on weakening the structure of the very ship he stands on; right now he is working on the metal holdings around the mast. He stands away cautiously as the weakened mast is hooked on to a whinge and it's pulled down. The bulking mast hits the bottom of the hull, the boom reaches his ears and touches his skin, it reminds him a little bit of his village, of his childhood, when he would drop a metal bucket in well to collect water. With no time for nostalgia he gets back to cutting another part of the hull, he does this every day for 8-10 hours; his safety net is his experience. He is one of the 66,00...

    published: 17 Jul 2014
  • Scrapped: the deadly business of dismantling ships in Bangladesh

    Bangladesh has no metal resources of its own city, so the shipbreaking yards in Chittagong, its largest second city, generate high profits for their owners. Workers though, enjoy none of the benefits of that profit; wages are barely enough to live on and there are no health and safety regulations to protect them. Injuries are a frequent occurrence and even death is not uncommon. SUBSCRIBE TO RTD Channel to get documentaries firsthand! http://bit.ly/1MgFbVy FOLLOW US RTD WEBSITE: https://RTD.rt.com/ RTD ON TWITTER: http://twitter.com/RT_DOC RTD ON FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/RTDocumentary RTD ON DAILYMOTION http://www.dailymotion.com/rt_doc RTD ON INSTAGRAM http://instagram.com/rt_documentary/ RTD LIVE https://rtd.rt.com/on-air/

    published: 13 Mar 2015
  • Turkey's massive ship recycling program

    In Aliaga, Turkey, large ships from around the world are dismantled, and the steel is recycled and sent to mills.

    published: 19 Oct 2011
  • Ship Breaking Industry of Bangladesh

    published: 06 Oct 2016
  • World's largest ship breaking yard is in Gujarat - Alang

    Indian labourers working at a ship breaking site in Alang, Gujarat, India.There are 185 plots to carry out the ship-recycling activities. This activity forms an industry by itself , as it provides around 30,000 jobs in Alang itself and generates steel totaling to millions of tons every year. Alang beach (Gujurat, India) is one of the main ship breaking yards in the world. Alang is a census town in Bhavnagar district in the Indian state of Gujarat, India.Alang is known as land of lakes and temples. However today Alang is known for being Asia's largest and world's one of the most important Ship Recycling Yard where various material like Melting scrap, Cast Iron Scrap (Beed), Rolling Material, Profile Plates, Marine Machinery, Marine Engine, Diesel Generating Sets, Electric Motors and so m...

    published: 25 Jun 2015
  • Ship breaking and recycling with improved safety and technology

    To find out more please visit: http://www.twi-global.com This short programme outlines the work of the Divest project, which was devised to promote clear unbiased information on the complexities of the ship dismantling industry so that stakeholders in the work can make informed decisions.

    published: 06 Mar 2012
  • Global Ship Breaking Industry by Simos Dimitriou

    Simos Dimitriou, Senior Trader - GMS, Sharing his views on Global Ship Breaking Industry. SteelMint Events organized the 2nd edition of Coal, Steel & Raw Material ConferenceEmerging Bangladesh that set up a unique platform for all the key industry leaders with global suppliers to discuss technology, trends, fresh ideas and potential business opportunities. For More Details Visit: http://events.steelmintgroup.com/ To Download Full Presentation of 2nd Coal, Steel & Raw Material Conference / Emerging Bangladesh Click Here: http://goo.gl/x4r0ae

    published: 15 Dec 2016
  • Pakistan's dying ship-breaking industry

    Once a thriving industry, years of economic decline have turned Pakistan's Gadani beach from a lifeline to the site of the nation's now-dying ship-breaking industry. Hard economic times have led most ships in the direction of neighbouring India and Bangladesh, where every piece of scrap metal and steel is salvaged. The Pakistanis who are still employed in the ship-breaking industry work for months at a time on a single vessel without protective gear to guard from the smoke and heavy materials they work around, with the nearest hospital over 50 kilometres away. Al Jazeera's Kamal Hyder reports from Baluchistan. At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story...

    published: 08 Jan 2012
  • The Vanishing Industry of Ship Breaking in Pakistan Part-1

    A group assignment by the students of University of Karachi M.A final Mass Communication evening session.

    published: 21 Jan 2008
  • ShipBreaking Industry in pakistan

    This video is about "The Largest Industry" Ship breaking in Pakistan situated at Gaddani in Balochistan province.

    published: 28 Oct 2009
  • Bangladesh: Ship Breaking Industry and the Environmental Impact

    http://www.outak.com - News, Information and Links

    published: 08 Jun 2008
  • Pakistan's ship breaking industry picking up

    Gadani, Balochistan, Pakistan 1. Various of the ship 'Flag Supplier' being dismantled 2. A watchman sitting at the beach 3. Various of workers dismantling the ship 4. Close up of a mechanised pulley in action pulling piece of the ship 5. A piece of ship being pulled into the sea 6. Ship breaker Aqeel Khan standing on the beach 7. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Aqeel Khan, ship breaker: "Work used to be brisk at the Gadani ship yards and once around 300 to 350 workers used to work in a single ship-breaking yard. But things have changed over the last few years and now barely 50 workers are employed in a single yard because of the non-availability of vessels." 8. Wide of empty ship-breaking yard at Gadani 9. Various of labourers cutting up pieces of iron 10. SOUNDBITE (Pushto) Mehran Mohannad...

    published: 28 Jul 2015
  • World's biggest ship breaking yard

    Ship breaking is one of the most hazardous jobs in the world because most ships are used to carry radioactive materials, toxic wastes, extremely poisonous chemicals and oil. Not only does it directly affect the health of the workers, it is an environmental time bomb - as workers strip the ships marooned on the sea shore, there is severe contamination of the sea bed, eventually seeping into the marine food chain. We visit the world's biggest ship breaking yard, Alang.

    published: 08 Mar 2011
  • Ship Breaking Industry.3GP

    While Jack was is in Khi

    published: 23 Sep 2010
  • Ship breaking industry

    published: 05 Mar 2017
  • WORLD’S LARGEST - SHIPBREAKING YARD - CHITTAGONG - BANGLADESH

    World’s largest ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh. Hello Viewers, Sitakund, Chittagong is one of the largest shipbreaking industries in the world. Once upon a time the tourists could travel freely in the yard area. But now, when you go there you have to follow the rules of the authorities. If you are a journalist then the matter is more strict.On 15th November, I visited some of the ship yards of Sitakund, Chittagong. I made this short video of that visit for you. Hope you will like it. History of shipbreaking in Chittagong, Bangladesh : Chittagong Ship Breaking Yard is located in Faujdarhat, Sitakund Upazila, Bangladesh along the 18 kilometres Sitakund coastal strip, 20 kilometres north-west of Chittagong. It is the world's largest ship breaking industry, employs over 200,000...

    published: 19 Nov 2017
  • Shipbreaking industry in Bangladesh

    published: 26 May 2017
  • Ship breakers yard receives boost with arrival of world's largest tanker

    Gaddani, Sindh Province: 1. Wide pan of Gaddani breakers yard to "Sea Giant" tanker 2. Mid shot of sparks from oxy-acetylene cutter emerging through side of ship's hull 3. Close-up of cutting flame 4. Mid shot breaker wearing dark welding goggles 5. Mid shot cutting 6. Wide of men cutting with oxy-acetylene torches inside hull of Sea Giant tanker 7. Mid shot ship breaker at work 8. Cut section of Sea Giant' s hull torn off into sea 9. Wide of crane moving steel sections 10. Mid shot of breakers at work 11. SOUNDBITE: (Urdu) Fataullah Shah, ship-breaker: "I've been in this business for the last 10 years. Now we have a lot of work. Before there wasn't much on. We are very happy and thank God we have a lot of work." 12. Wide of "Sea Giant" tanker 13. Mid shot cable passing thro...

    published: 21 Jul 2015
  • Pakistan Ship Breaking Industry{ABDUL REHMAN AMJAD}

    Pakistan World 3rd Largest Ship Breaking Industry

    published: 26 Jul 2010
developed with YouTube
Where Ships Go to Die, Workers Risk Everything | National Geographic
4:40

Where Ships Go to Die, Workers Risk Everything | National Geographic

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:40
  • Updated: 16 Apr 2014
  • views: 8599080
videos
In Bangladesh, men desperate for work perform one of the world's most dangerous jobs. They demolish huge ships in grueling conditions, braving disease, pollution, and the threat of being crushed or stabbed by steel sliced from the hulls. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta Explore the lives of ship-breakers online in National Geographic magazine: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2014/05/shipbreakers/gwin-text PHOTOGRAPHY & VIDEOGRAPHY: Mike Hettwer EDITOR: Spencer Millsap Where Ships Go to Die, Workers Risk Everything | National Geographic https://youtu.be/WOmtFN1bfZ8 National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
https://wn.com/Where_Ships_Go_To_Die,_Workers_Risk_Everything_|_National_Geographic
Ship breaking industry in India - Alang, Gujarat
1:34

Ship breaking industry in India - Alang, Gujarat

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:34
  • Updated: 15 Jun 2015
  • views: 3206
videos
Alang beach (Gujurat, India) is one of the main ship breaking yards in the world. Alang is a census town in Bhavnagar district in the Indian state of Gujarat, India.Alang is known as land of lakes and temples. However today Alang is known for being Asia's largest and world's one of the most important Ship Recycling Yard where various material like Melting scrap, Cast Iron Scrap (Beed), Rolling Material, Profile Plates, Marine Machinery, Marine Engine, Diesel Generating Sets, Electric Motors and so many other items which are available in huge quantity of various qualities are mostly tested and certified by the world famous Lloyds Certifying Co. of England. As per the international reports, more ships for demolition are expected for Alang as Ocean freight is very down. Presently, Alang & Sosiya has 94 ships under demolition. Courtesy: http://www.alangtoday.com/ This footage is part of the professionally-shot broadcast stock footage archive of Wilderness Films India Ltd., the largest collection of HD imagery from South Asia. The Wilderness Films India collection comprises of 50, 000+ hours of high quality broadcast imagery, mostly shot on HDCAM / SR 1080i High Definition, Alexa, SR, XDCAM and 4K. Write to us for licensing this footage on a broadcast format, for use in your production! We are happy to be commissioned to film for you or else provide you with broadcast crewing and production solutions across South Asia. We pride ourselves in bringing the best of India and South Asia to the world... Please subscribe to our channel wildfilmsindia on Youtube for a steady stream of videos from across India. Also, visit and enjoy your journey across India at www.clipahoy.com , India's first video-based social networking experience! Reach us at rupindang@gmail.com and admin@wildfilmsindia.com
https://wn.com/Ship_Breaking_Industry_In_India_Alang,_Gujarat
The Ship Breakers of Bangladesh: VICE INTL
10:15

The Ship Breakers of Bangladesh: VICE INTL

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:15
  • Updated: 09 Feb 2015
  • views: 614185
videos
There aren't too many places left in the world where the practice of ship breaking—scrapping old ships for metal—can still exist. These days, environmental and labor regulations in the developed world have displaced the practice to India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan, where cargo carriers are salvaged for their steel. The largest vessels wind up on the shores of the city of Chittagong in Bangladesh, where the industry has become a vital part of the country's urbanization. It employs roughly 200,000 workers and supplies the country with 80 percent of its steel. Ship breakers beach and dismantle vessels daily wearing flip­-flops and T-shirts. It's no easy task, considering ships are constructed to withstand the elements for the 30 years they spend operating on international waters. We decided to check it out. Click here to subscribe to VICE: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE Check out our full video catalog: http://bit.ly/VICE-Videos Videos, daily editorial and more: http://vice.com More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos Like VICE on Facebook: http://fb.com/vice Follow VICE on Twitter: http://twitter.com/vice Read our Tumblr: http://vicemag.tumblr.com Follow us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/vice
https://wn.com/The_Ship_Breakers_Of_Bangladesh_Vice_Intl
Shipbreakers
1:12:52

Shipbreakers

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:12:52
  • Updated: 21 Jun 2017
  • views: 228330
videos
This feature documentary profiles a bustling Indian shantytown where 40,000 people live and work in the most primitive conditions.
https://wn.com/Shipbreakers
The Wire Nest...life In Mumbai's Shipbreaking Yards
22:05

The Wire Nest...life In Mumbai's Shipbreaking Yards

  • Order:
  • Duration: 22:05
  • Updated: 24 Jan 2013
  • views: 631591
videos
We all have heard of the Titanic, its love story, and how it laid to rest under the ocean. But for lesser ships there is a different grave waiting. One which is an obscure & lucrative business for a few known as Ship breaking, Countless numbers of used ships are sent to developing countries like China, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan and Turkey where they are systematically broken down by the cheap labor hired by these ship breakers . 'The Wire Nest...Life In Mumbai's Ship-Breaking Yards' is a documentary on the condition of these workers, the majority who live in filthy and hazardous circumstances .This documentary specifically gives an insight on the conditions of the ship breaking workers in Mumbai the city which is the hub for many activities known and unknown. To build awareness and give an insight on the deteriorating conditions of the workers. And the shocking lack of human consideration given to them. Take note as this time we go even deeper into the graveyard taking a closer glimpse into the hardships and tragedies these workers face, doing their job while constantly being under real mortal danger .The story of a family man, a lady who lost her family, a family who got compensation for their dead son, and the result of the workers strike for a fellow worker. A honest glimpse into the cogs that run the ship breaking industry.
https://wn.com/The_Wire_Nest...Life_In_Mumbai's_Shipbreaking_Yards
Echoes of Ship Breaking
36:58

Echoes of Ship Breaking

  • Order:
  • Duration: 36:58
  • Updated: 17 Jul 2014
  • views: 308121
videos
The bothering heat and shouts of his Mukadam mingles with the echoes of machine and men usually 30 to 70 feet below him. He has to silence it all when he turns on his blow torch and focuses solely on weakening the structure of the very ship he stands on; right now he is working on the metal holdings around the mast. He stands away cautiously as the weakened mast is hooked on to a whinge and it's pulled down. The bulking mast hits the bottom of the hull, the boom reaches his ears and touches his skin, it reminds him a little bit of his village, of his childhood, when he would drop a metal bucket in well to collect water. With no time for nostalgia he gets back to cutting another part of the hull, he does this every day for 8-10 hours; his safety net is his experience. He is one of the 66,000 workers who work on the ship breaking yards at Alang in Gujarat and Darukhana in Mumbai. They migrate from UP, Orissa, Bihar and various other states across India in search of employment and better life. The job of these workers is to strip the raw materials from these ships and sell them to various integral industries i.e. construction, steel mills, to name a few. The ship breaking industry as always been surrounded with myths and controversies. With many reports in the media mostly giving it a broad tag of "hazardous to environment" which is far from the truth, what ship-breaking actually does is reuse valuable raw materials striped from a dead ship, which would end up being more hazardous if left in the sea. The primary pressing issue of ship breaking which gets skirted is its workers. The process of ship-breaking requires workers from the start to the end. Often to skirt costs; untrained contractual workers will be hired, safety equipment will be ignored and benefits will be skimmed. In this documentary 'Echoes of Ship-Breaking' we'll be entering through the backdoor of the ship-breaking industry to see: • How the industry processes labour and ships • How ships are brought in and labourers are hired, and how it starts • The industry's questionable history regarding worker laws • Why and how ship breaking reached India • How ship breaking affects the environment • Breaking down the process of ship-breaking in India • Its contribution to India and the future of ship breaking in India
https://wn.com/Echoes_Of_Ship_Breaking
Scrapped: the deadly business of dismantling ships in Bangladesh
26:14

Scrapped: the deadly business of dismantling ships in Bangladesh

  • Order:
  • Duration: 26:14
  • Updated: 13 Mar 2015
  • views: 1204173
videos
Bangladesh has no metal resources of its own city, so the shipbreaking yards in Chittagong, its largest second city, generate high profits for their owners. Workers though, enjoy none of the benefits of that profit; wages are barely enough to live on and there are no health and safety regulations to protect them. Injuries are a frequent occurrence and even death is not uncommon. SUBSCRIBE TO RTD Channel to get documentaries firsthand! http://bit.ly/1MgFbVy FOLLOW US RTD WEBSITE: https://RTD.rt.com/ RTD ON TWITTER: http://twitter.com/RT_DOC RTD ON FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/RTDocumentary RTD ON DAILYMOTION http://www.dailymotion.com/rt_doc RTD ON INSTAGRAM http://instagram.com/rt_documentary/ RTD LIVE https://rtd.rt.com/on-air/
https://wn.com/Scrapped_The_Deadly_Business_Of_Dismantling_Ships_In_Bangladesh
Turkey's massive ship recycling program
2:53

Turkey's massive ship recycling program

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:53
  • Updated: 19 Oct 2011
  • views: 63730
videos
In Aliaga, Turkey, large ships from around the world are dismantled, and the steel is recycled and sent to mills.
https://wn.com/Turkey's_Massive_Ship_Recycling_Program
Ship Breaking Industry of Bangladesh
10:46

Ship Breaking Industry of Bangladesh

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:46
  • Updated: 06 Oct 2016
  • views: 690
videos
https://wn.com/Ship_Breaking_Industry_Of_Bangladesh
World's largest ship breaking yard is in Gujarat - Alang
1:32

World's largest ship breaking yard is in Gujarat - Alang

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:32
  • Updated: 25 Jun 2015
  • views: 24277
videos
Indian labourers working at a ship breaking site in Alang, Gujarat, India.There are 185 plots to carry out the ship-recycling activities. This activity forms an industry by itself , as it provides around 30,000 jobs in Alang itself and generates steel totaling to millions of tons every year. Alang beach (Gujurat, India) is one of the main ship breaking yards in the world. Alang is a census town in Bhavnagar district in the Indian state of Gujarat, India.Alang is known as land of lakes and temples. However today Alang is known for being Asia's largest and world's one of the most important Ship Recycling Yard where various material like Melting scrap, Cast Iron Scrap (Beed), Rolling Material, Profile Plates, Marine Machinery, Marine Engine, Diesel Generating Sets, Electric Motors and so many other items which are available in huge quantity of various qualities are mostly tested and certified by the world famous Lloyds Certifying Co. of England. As per the international reports, more ships for demolition are expected for Alang as Ocean freight is very down. Presently, Alang & Sosiya has 94 ships under demolition. Courtesy: http://www.alangtoday.com/ This footage is part of the professionally-shot broadcast stock footage archive of Wilderness Films India Ltd., the largest collection of HD imagery from South Asia. The Wilderness Films India collection comprises of 50, 000+ hours of high quality broadcast imagery, mostly shot on HDCAM / SR 1080i High Definition, Alexa, SR, XDCAM and 4K. Write to us for licensing this footage on a broadcast format, for use in your production! We are happy to be commissioned to film for you or else provide you with broadcast crewing and production solutions across South Asia. We pride ourselves in bringing the best of India and South Asia to the world... Please subscribe to our channel wildfilmsindia on Youtube for a steady stream of videos from across India. Also, visit and enjoy your journey across India at www.clipahoy.com , India's first video-based social networking experience! Reach us at rupindang@gmail.com and admin@wildfilmsindia.com
https://wn.com/World's_Largest_Ship_Breaking_Yard_Is_In_Gujarat_Alang
Ship breaking and recycling with improved safety and technology
8:39

Ship breaking and recycling with improved safety and technology

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:39
  • Updated: 06 Mar 2012
  • views: 192266
videos
To find out more please visit: http://www.twi-global.com This short programme outlines the work of the Divest project, which was devised to promote clear unbiased information on the complexities of the ship dismantling industry so that stakeholders in the work can make informed decisions.
https://wn.com/Ship_Breaking_And_Recycling_With_Improved_Safety_And_Technology
Global Ship Breaking Industry by Simos Dimitriou
17:34

Global Ship Breaking Industry by Simos Dimitriou

  • Order:
  • Duration: 17:34
  • Updated: 15 Dec 2016
  • views: 164
videos
Simos Dimitriou, Senior Trader - GMS, Sharing his views on Global Ship Breaking Industry. SteelMint Events organized the 2nd edition of Coal, Steel & Raw Material ConferenceEmerging Bangladesh that set up a unique platform for all the key industry leaders with global suppliers to discuss technology, trends, fresh ideas and potential business opportunities. For More Details Visit: http://events.steelmintgroup.com/ To Download Full Presentation of 2nd Coal, Steel & Raw Material Conference / Emerging Bangladesh Click Here: http://goo.gl/x4r0ae
https://wn.com/Global_Ship_Breaking_Industry_By_Simos_Dimitriou
Pakistan's dying ship-breaking industry
2:07

Pakistan's dying ship-breaking industry

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:07
  • Updated: 08 Jan 2012
  • views: 8394
videos
Once a thriving industry, years of economic decline have turned Pakistan's Gadani beach from a lifeline to the site of the nation's now-dying ship-breaking industry. Hard economic times have led most ships in the direction of neighbouring India and Bangladesh, where every piece of scrap metal and steel is salvaged. The Pakistanis who are still employed in the ship-breaking industry work for months at a time on a single vessel without protective gear to guard from the smoke and heavy materials they work around, with the nearest hospital over 50 kilometres away. Al Jazeera's Kamal Hyder reports from Baluchistan. At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a 'voice to the voiceless.' Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world's most respected news and current affairs channels. Social Media links: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Instagram: https://instagram.com/aljazeera/?ref=... Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajenglish Website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ google+: https://plus.google.com/+aljazeera/posts
https://wn.com/Pakistan's_Dying_Ship_Breaking_Industry
The Vanishing Industry of Ship Breaking in Pakistan Part-1
5:47

The Vanishing Industry of Ship Breaking in Pakistan Part-1

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:47
  • Updated: 21 Jan 2008
  • views: 7162
videos
A group assignment by the students of University of Karachi M.A final Mass Communication evening session.
https://wn.com/The_Vanishing_Industry_Of_Ship_Breaking_In_Pakistan_Part_1
ShipBreaking Industry in pakistan
4:14

ShipBreaking Industry in pakistan

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:14
  • Updated: 28 Oct 2009
  • views: 5663
videos
This video is about "The Largest Industry" Ship breaking in Pakistan situated at Gaddani in Balochistan province.
https://wn.com/Shipbreaking_Industry_In_Pakistan
Bangladesh: Ship Breaking Industry and the Environmental Impact
1:23

Bangladesh: Ship Breaking Industry and the Environmental Impact

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:23
  • Updated: 08 Jun 2008
  • views: 4408
videos
http://www.outak.com - News, Information and Links
https://wn.com/Bangladesh_Ship_Breaking_Industry_And_The_Environmental_Impact
Pakistan's ship breaking industry picking up
4:12

Pakistan's ship breaking industry picking up

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:12
  • Updated: 28 Jul 2015
  • views: 1167
videos
Gadani, Balochistan, Pakistan 1. Various of the ship 'Flag Supplier' being dismantled 2. A watchman sitting at the beach 3. Various of workers dismantling the ship 4. Close up of a mechanised pulley in action pulling piece of the ship 5. A piece of ship being pulled into the sea 6. Ship breaker Aqeel Khan standing on the beach 7. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) Aqeel Khan, ship breaker: "Work used to be brisk at the Gadani ship yards and once around 300 to 350 workers used to work in a single ship-breaking yard. But things have changed over the last few years and now barely 50 workers are employed in a single yard because of the non-availability of vessels." 8. Wide of empty ship-breaking yard at Gadani 9. Various of labourers cutting up pieces of iron 10. SOUNDBITE (Pushto) Mehran Mohannad, ship breaker: "I have come here from the north of the country to work but the work is not consistent here. When I do get a job I send all the money to my family but when there is no work it becomes very difficult to survive." 11. Various of ship breaking yard Karachi, Pakistan 12. SOUNDBITE (Urdu) : Mohammad Umar Memon, Pakistan Ship Breakers' Association: "Pakistan's used to be number 2 after Taiwan in ship breaking. But with the passage of time and changing market conditions the industry has become virtually dead. The prices of ships that we used to purchase at US$150 per metric ton from the international market rose sharply to US$350 to US$400 per metric ton because of buying from China and Bangladesh. Because of this situation the importing of ships became unfeasible. But after negotiations with the government (the Pakistan government slashed customs duty and income tax on the industry), they agreed to give some incentives to the industry and now the industry today is getting back on its feet." Gadani, Balochistan, Pakistan 13. Various of workers cutting ship plate 14. Various of bulldozer shifting pieces of metal 15. Workers loading a truck. 16. Transport vehicle leaving the yard. 17. Transport vehicle on Mehran Coastal highway to Karachi LEAD IN: A once booming industry in Pakistan, ship breaking, has been through difficult times in past few years. Recent talks between industry representatives and the government, however, has meant the ship yards are about to get a new lease of life. STORYLINE: The 'Flag Supplier' a 12-thousand ton ship, was manufactured in Japan in 1978, spent her years sailing the seven seas and recently arrived here on the shores of the Arabian Sea. She has been retired and has come here to the Gadani ship yards in Pakistan for dismantling. Huge pieces of the ship are removed little by little, bit by bit. Ship breaking used to be a huge industry for Pakistan but has declined over the years following a surge in the international prices for second-hand ships. The Pakistani industry was also not able to compete with China, Bangladesh and India, where duties are much lower and more industry-friendly. Aqeel Khan has been working at the ship breaking yards for the past 20 years. He says the industry is not what it was. Gadani ship breaking yard, once a huge local employer is now virtually empty. Hundreds of workers had to be laid off because there were simply no ships to dismantle. Ship breaker Mehran Mohannad travelled from the north of Pakistan to work in ship breaking. He says the work is good -- when he gets it. But the industry is slowly but surely recovering. Representatives from the ship-breaking industry have been able to convince the Pakistani government to provide some incentives to revive the industry. The government abolished customs duty on the import of second-hand ships, meaning it was profitable for the ships to be dismantled at Gadani again. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/d388833183441edb4d90aaf47d7a7730 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
https://wn.com/Pakistan's_Ship_Breaking_Industry_Picking_Up
World's biggest ship breaking yard
4:34

World's biggest ship breaking yard

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  • Duration: 4:34
  • Updated: 08 Mar 2011
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Ship breaking is one of the most hazardous jobs in the world because most ships are used to carry radioactive materials, toxic wastes, extremely poisonous chemicals and oil. Not only does it directly affect the health of the workers, it is an environmental time bomb - as workers strip the ships marooned on the sea shore, there is severe contamination of the sea bed, eventually seeping into the marine food chain. We visit the world's biggest ship breaking yard, Alang.
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Ship Breaking Industry.3GP
3:56

Ship Breaking Industry.3GP

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  • Duration: 3:56
  • Updated: 23 Sep 2010
  • views: 646
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While Jack was is in Khi
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Ship breaking industry
3:52

Ship breaking industry

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  • Updated: 05 Mar 2017
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WORLD’S LARGEST - SHIPBREAKING YARD - CHITTAGONG - BANGLADESH
6:22

WORLD’S LARGEST - SHIPBREAKING YARD - CHITTAGONG - BANGLADESH

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  • Duration: 6:22
  • Updated: 19 Nov 2017
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World’s largest ship-breaking yard in Chittagong, Bangladesh. Hello Viewers, Sitakund, Chittagong is one of the largest shipbreaking industries in the world. Once upon a time the tourists could travel freely in the yard area. But now, when you go there you have to follow the rules of the authorities. If you are a journalist then the matter is more strict.On 15th November, I visited some of the ship yards of Sitakund, Chittagong. I made this short video of that visit for you. Hope you will like it. History of shipbreaking in Chittagong, Bangladesh : Chittagong Ship Breaking Yard is located in Faujdarhat, Sitakund Upazila, Bangladesh along the 18 kilometres Sitakund coastal strip, 20 kilometres north-west of Chittagong. It is the world's largest ship breaking industry, employs over 200,000 Bangladeshis and accounts for around a fifth of all the steel in Bangladesh. In 1960, after a severe cyclone, the Greek ship M D Alpine was stranded on the shores of Sitakund, Chittagong. It could not be re-floated and so remained there for several years. In 1965, Chittagong Steel House bought the ship and had it scrapped. It took years to scrap the vessel, but the work gave birth to the industry in Bangladesh. During the Bangladesh Liberation War, a Pakistani ship Al Abbas was damaged by bombing. Later on, the ship was salvaged by a Soviet team who were working at Chittagong port at the time and the ship was brought to the Faujdarhat seashore. A local company, Karnafully Metal Works Ltd bought it as scrap in 1974 and introduced commercial ship breaking in the country. The industry grew steadily through the 1980s and, by the middle of the 1990s, the country ranked number two in the world by tonnage scrapped. In 2008, there were 26 ship breaking yards in the area, and in 2009 there were 40. From 2004 to 2008, the area was the largest ship-breaking yard in the world. However, by 2012 it had dropped from half to a fifth of worldwide ship-breaking.
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Shipbreaking industry in Bangladesh
2:15

Shipbreaking industry in Bangladesh

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  • Duration: 2:15
  • Updated: 26 May 2017
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Ship breakers yard receives boost with arrival of world's largest tanker
2:35

Ship breakers yard receives boost with arrival of world's largest tanker

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  • Duration: 2:35
  • Updated: 21 Jul 2015
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Gaddani, Sindh Province: 1. Wide pan of Gaddani breakers yard to "Sea Giant" tanker 2. Mid shot of sparks from oxy-acetylene cutter emerging through side of ship's hull 3. Close-up of cutting flame 4. Mid shot breaker wearing dark welding goggles 5. Mid shot cutting 6. Wide of men cutting with oxy-acetylene torches inside hull of Sea Giant tanker 7. Mid shot ship breaker at work 8. Cut section of Sea Giant' s hull torn off into sea 9. Wide of crane moving steel sections 10. Mid shot of breakers at work 11. SOUNDBITE: (Urdu) Fataullah Shah, ship-breaker: "I've been in this business for the last 10 years. Now we have a lot of work. Before there wasn't much on. We are very happy and thank God we have a lot of work." 12. Wide of "Sea Giant" tanker 13. Mid shot cable passing through pulley 14. Mid shot winch being operated 15. Close up pulley 16. Mid shot section of ship towed through sea 17. Mid shot prow of a ship 18. Mid shot breakers yard workers seen through porthole 19. Wide shot breakers yard 20. Mid shot power shovel moving cut metal 21. Mid shot men through porthole 22. Mid shot breakers yard 23. SOUNDBITE: (English) M. Ishaq Paracha, Managing Director of Gaddani's ship breaking yard: "We have made many technical advances. We can break a very large ship in about 3 to 4 months time. The ship breaking is always been running depending on the availability of vessels and recently the demand of steel has picked up in the country and business is very good." 24. Wide of plane flying over wreck of oil tanker 'Tasman Spirit' 25. Long shot 'Tasman Spirit' tanker 26. Wide of oil spill clean up operation continuing on beach 27. Mid shot oil spill clean up workers STORYLINE: Pakistan's ship-breaking industry has received a massive boost thanks to the arrival of world's second biggest oil tanker at a breakers yard close to the southern port city of Karachi. This breakers yard on the Gaddani coastline, 40km (25 miles), east of Karachi, is the final resting place for the juggernaut supertanker 'The Sea Giant'. Its massive capacity, 555,000 Dwt (deadweight tons), made it the second biggest oil tanker on earth. The huge task of dismantling the French-built 'Sea Giant' is expected to revitalize Pakistan's ship-breaking industry and create more jobs. The industry on the edge of this sleepy town on the Arabian sea has been struggling to revive itself from a bearish spell in business. During the 1990s the Gaddani industry broke 40 ships in a year, but business has dwindled to just over a dozen ships a year now. The arrival of the gigantic supertanker, which used to carry half-a-million-tons of crude to the U.S. from Saudi Arabia, is just break the industry was looking for. M. Ishaq Paracha, Managing Director of Gaddani's ship breaking yard said that the recent "demand of steel has picked up in the country and business is very good." The arrival of the giant ship comes only weeks after Pakistan suffered its worst environmental disaster when an oil tanker 'Tasman Spirit' spilled thousands of tons of crude on the sea-shores near the Karachi port. The government is seeking 1 (b) billion US dollars in damages for the oil pollution caused from that disaster. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/6749fd8652977d2bd0cadc4dc0a062b3 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
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Pakistan Ship Breaking Industry{ABDUL REHMAN AMJAD}
1:42

Pakistan Ship Breaking Industry{ABDUL REHMAN AMJAD}

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  • Duration: 1:42
  • Updated: 26 Jul 2010
  • views: 7684
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